?

Log in

No account? Create an account
So very, very right^H^H^H^H^H wrong - Baxil [bakh-HEEL'], n. My Sites [Tomorrowlands] [The TTU Wiki] [Photos]
View My LJ [By Tag]


October 1st, 2007
07:40 pm
[User Picture]

[Link]

Previous Entry Share Next Entry
So very, very right^H^H^H^H^H wrong
I just noticed that our organic grocery store sells a "Laser Enhanced" dietary supplement.

"Laser Enhanced" is an awesome slogan, but it's still waiting for a bright and exciting new field of technology to add value to.* For something you're putting inside your body, maybe not so much.

--
* Sadly, microcomputers missed the boat by about a decade on this one. The switch from floppy drives to CD-ROMs would have been perfect. "Tired of rubber-banded stacks of floppies? Get the new LASER-ENHANCED OmniBox 2001! Windows 3.1 has never installed so easily."

Current Location: ~calorg
Current Mood: sillysilly
Current Music: The Layaways, "We've Been Lost"
Tags: ,

(16 comments | Leave a comment)

Comments
 
From:premchai21
Date:October 2nd, 2007 04:44 am (UTC)
(Link)

USB 3.0.

[User Picture]
From:baxil
Date:October 4th, 2007 02:19 am (UTC)
(Link)
WIRELESS usb 3.0.
[User Picture]
From:roaminrob
Date:October 2nd, 2007 06:24 am (UTC)
(Link)
Most of the stuff sold in those two aisles is bunk. Some of it is actually dangerous. I used to point that out occasionally, and that made me rather unpopular.
[User Picture]
From:baxil
Date:October 2nd, 2007 06:50 am (UTC)
(Link)
I don't have a problem with (most of) the vitamins and supplements, which at least have demonstrable biochemical effects. But it floors me how much of the aisle is devoted to elaborately purified water. And how often people ask for it, because I sure don't steer them toward the homeopathics.*

--
* One important note here I've needed to say for a while. I've had someone argue to me in the past (can't find the link offhand) that homeopathy works on sound metaphysical principles and I shouldn't be so uncritical of magic if I'm not willing to accept the Law of Contagion. But here's the thing: If homeopathy worked as advertised, then the tiny amounts of massive numbers of unsavory trace chemicals in tap water would basically MAKE US DIE every time we took a sip. Not to mention all of the thousands of things we're exposed to at minuscule levels every day.

If I'm going to accept the law of contagion, I have to accept that it works as an active principle - it works due to intent. In which case, homeopathic preparations are a mere crutch for the intent itself, and I'd rather get the healing intent straight from the source rather than filtered through several machines and packaged up in a tiny expensive tube.
From:mithent
Date:October 2nd, 2007 02:16 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Wouldn't tap water, by the rules of homeopathy, cure everything rather than kill you? Trace (or less than trace) amounts of compounds are supposed to be extremely potent at curing diseases which they would cause the same symptoms as at high concentrations.
[User Picture]
From:lysana
Date:October 2nd, 2007 10:03 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Here's the irony about that. One science lab went through the process of trying to disprove homeopathy. They were doing a bang-up job of it, too. Then they went through with one heart medication and found it was still working on the diseased heart cells in the testing space at homeopathic dilutions. Logically, by the rules of homeopathy, the reverse should have happened.

Of course, I'm also someone who's gotten repeatedly good results from a homeopathic flu remedy that I took with all due skepticism on first brush with it but has also noticed other touted remedies in that field are as useful to me as eating SweeTarts.
[User Picture]
From:baxil
Date:October 4th, 2007 02:14 am (UTC)
(Link)
I probably should have said, "If I'm going to accept the Law of Contagion as written", or "as applied to homeopathy" or some such.

Interesting to hear of the heart medication study. I may have to do a little more research on what the controlled experiments have shown. If there are demonstrable, repeatable effects at that dosage (even if they're not the ones advertised), then there is obviously something going on here (even if the theory that purports to explain it can't hold together).
[User Picture]
From:baxil
Date:October 4th, 2007 02:20 am (UTC)
(Link)
Correction noted. Point stands.
[User Picture]
From:elynne
Date:October 2nd, 2007 11:05 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I *heart* my homeopathic stop-that-damn-allergic-reaction arsenic pills. *heart* them very much.

So I figured, hey one homeopathic thing worked, why not try another? I had a head full of mucus, so I grabbed one of the three-four homeopathic "get rid of some of the mucus in your head" tubes, and tried it. And, well - yay sugar pills. No change in mucus.

Sometimes, the magic works... ;)
[User Picture]
From:kadyg
Date:October 2nd, 2007 11:08 am (UTC)
(Link)
>Some of it is actually dangerous.

I did a hard gulp the first time I spotted bella donna extract on the shelf. I haven't examined the bottle closely (it might be gone, for that matter), but in its natural state it's an extremely powerful hallucinagin and, in slightly larger amounts, very fatal. I would hate to think that someone mistook "natural" for "mostly harmless".
[User Picture]
From:natetg
Date:October 2nd, 2007 01:21 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Of course, we call it bella donna (pretty lady) is because of its cosmetic use in eye drops to dialate the pupils. It's probably more better known as deadly nightshade.

Do they keep it on the shelf next to the foxglove?
[User Picture]
From:kadyg
Date:October 3rd, 2007 05:44 am (UTC)
(Link)
Probably. Like Rob, I tend to stay out of that aisle. A lot of the stuff there looks like it was bottled in someone's bathroom with nebulus labeling. I'm perfectly happy to take home-grown stuff, but I really really want to know what I'm taking.
[User Picture]
From:tronpublic
Date:October 2nd, 2007 06:56 am (UTC)
(Link)
Just today, a coworker pointed me to this:

http://www.aulterra.com/en-US/welcome/items
[User Picture]
From:quen_elf
Date:October 2nd, 2007 08:12 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Switch from DSL to fibre optic, if it ever happens? LASER ENHANCED!

They're skating pretty close to that with 'Blu-ray' disc, mind.
[User Picture]
From:joysweeper
Date:October 3rd, 2007 11:16 am (UTC)
(Link)
Lasers make *everything* better! I feel lessened by the lack of coherent light in my diet!

Seriously, that's... kind of odd.
[User Picture]
From:baxil
Date:October 4th, 2007 02:17 am (UTC)
(Link)
If they actually could package a laser in such a way as to make it (safely) edible, I would totally give it a try. If only for the bragging value of literally eating light.

I think the intent of the packaging was to say that the compounds included were whacked with lasers in such a way as to transform them into something more readily digestible. "Laser enhanced" really didn't do the concept justice. But I have to admit it was one of the more awesome turns of phrase that they could have used.
Tomorrowlands Powered by LiveJournal.com